We are apologize for the inconvenience but you need to download
more modern browser in order to be able to browse our page

BBC Hindi does a review of Harpreet’s album “Ajab Ishq Maati Da ” !

img2

 

You can listen to the samples and download the album here
https://www.oklisten.com/album/ajab_ishq_maati_da

And what a review on MoiFightClub the alternative film discussion site .Each song is reviewed with love and honesty.”I would love to hear what you have to say about the album, but personally speaking, all the new talent that comes up these days has just bollywood aspirations, and that leaves us music fanatics to look to our neighbors and get jealous. There are very few bands which try to present themselves as viable alternatives to the ‘drum-dholki-dafli-autotune-infected-Bollywood’ sound company. Harpreet represents a new sound which I hope gets popular and sells!
Art speaks differently to different people. To me, a good music album always makes me want to become a musician and explore the wondrous heritage of music that our country has. Take the old sounds, mix them with new, let nothing be what it has been since ages. Change, because it is wonderful.
We always tag the foreign music with ‘genres’, this album is Indian, and boy, what a genre it would be if paid attention and money.For once, I wish we would give out ‘star’ rating because this album and the supreme effort would have got 10 stars out of 5. Illogical? Well, which star rating isn’t?

Highly recommended.”

https://moifightclub.wordpress.com/…/music-recco-ajab-ishq…/
http://www.bbc.com/…/2015/06/150619_musicreview_harpreet_vdz

 

img 1

 

 

March 11, 2015

Mangalam

India has been a calling. For many. To journey. Into, into, into. Themselves. And through that, to discover, to uncover, the eternal, the universal All. For this, she has offered many streams to dive into. One of those is a huge gushing river. They call it, Hindu. Its a word that is not India’s. The Persians gave it. The British, for simplicity, carried it forward. It is after a river, Sindhu. Or Indus.

For many brought up in our times, the word – not unlike the others- brings to mind images, loaded with senselss violence, and pain. Or, on the flip side, with jingoistic reclamation of a past pride. Ego. Ahamkar. The one thing that the ancient Hindu sages said was false, that had to be not just left, but consciously killed, dissolved. Maro, he jogi, Maro. Die, o Yogi, Die. Maran hai Meetha. Death is Sweet.

For that death of the ego, were journeys, pilgrimages. For that death of the ego were prayers. For that death of the ego were stories. For that death of the ego was, Life. Said, unsaid. Every religion on earth designs itself this way. The ancient Hindus just bang into the head. Phatak! Dhyan. Bhakti. Karm. Choose a path. Live it. Or you are back. Again, and again. Till you get the idea right.

And they practised. Ego-dissolution. In the cold peaks of the Himalayas. The chilling waters of the Ganges. They chanted. Used Sound. Used asanas, body postures. Imagination, breath, body, concentration, contemplation. Nothing was left untouched. To Search. For that One truth. And … they prayed. To the river, to the mountain, to the earth, the sky. For support. They knew. Life is not just this one body. The soul moves. The bird, the tree, the minerals, the water, the rock … are no different from humans. One can become, unbecome, anytime. Connections. Web. Of Life. Eternal.

River, tree, mountains … they were all Gods. All Divine. And, of all fountains of Bliss, all seekers of Truth, Nature gave the roots. Moses heard the divine voice in a burning bush. Through a river was Jesus baptised. A spider protected Muhammed. In oneness with a river, Nanak found Bliss. Siddhartha became a Buddha under a tree. It happened when he touched the Earth. The bush, the river, the spider, the tree. The Earth. They gave us the roots, so we could fly.

A film by Akanksha Joshi | Produced by PSBT & Ministry of External Affairs | Created at the Random Maharasa Studio | www.hindunectar.in

Hindu Nectar – Director Speak

A film is a personal experience first, then a collective. Like Religion. A few words from the Hindu Nectar’s director on her spiritual wanderings while making the film | www.hindunectar.in |

To connect : www.facebook.com/hindunectar

Harpreet ~ “Ajnabi” – Music Video launched.

Ajnabi is the first single from Harpreet’s debut album “AJAB ISHQ …maati da”. Written and composed by Harpreet, this melodious blues song tries to capture the essence of zindagi (life), ishq (love) and waqt (time). Perfectly balancing the lyrical and philosophical, the contemporary guitar work of this number makes it a musical treat.

MUSIC CREDITS:
Vocals, Guitars, Lyrics and Composition: Harpreet
Drums and Percussion: Nikhil Vasudevan
Bass: Anirban Ghosh
Lead Guitar: Chaitanya Bhalla

Recording Studios:
Instruments at Studio Beat Route, New Delhi
Vocals at KJ Singh Studio A6TG, Mumbai

Mixing Engineer: KJ Singh

Mastering Engineer: Donal, Mastering World UK

Special Thanks to Susmit Sen

VIDEO CREDITS:
Direction: Vernita Verma

Cinematography:
Studio – Mayank Agrawal
Outdoor – Karan Khera

Styling:
Gunjan Arora
Shalini
Post Production:
Vishal Tejwani

Camera and Studio Courtesy:
AMG Studio (Anglian Management Group Studio)

This journey was made possible by support of Sunny Narang and Random Maharasa Entertainment. A big thanks to them.

Hindu Nectar: Spiritual Wanderings in India (Excerpt)

A daughter’s journey distilling the nectar of the stories she heard as a child. Weaving ancient texts in the fabric of modern life. Rediscovering the land of her childhood. Where religion was synonymous with the celebration of life.

Journeying from the Himalayas to Peninsular India. Through rivers, mountains, forests, caves. She meets many practitioners. Each conversation reveals unfathomable depths to the seemingly simple rituals. The nature of life. Why we are born. Why we die. What is change. And what amidst this constant flux – joy, sorrow; success, failure; love, hate – is the One … constant, unchanging, unmoving.
This cinematic journey creates an experiential rendering of one of the Earth’s oldest spiritual traditions.

Come. Wander. Experience.

Teachers Day Out

Happy, focused, relaxed teachers. Make happy students.
Joyous, oriented, delighting students. Make a wholesome, rich, tension free society.

This workshop on Conflict Resolution was facilitated by Random Maharasa’s Creative Director, Akanksha Joshi (Damini). It was attended by 45 teachers of Army Public School, Delhi.

Sessions involved understanding conflicts, intellectually and intuitively. Using dance, theatre, storytelling and meditation practices, as tools for resolution. The mantra that Damini uses for such conflict resolution workshops is simple : “Confilcts are not to be solved, but to be dissolved”

At Random Maharasa we aim to inspire and engage school communities through practices that connect academic education with social, emotional, cultural and aesthetic learning.

You can contact the facilitator at: akjo@randomaharasa.in

Hindu Nectar – Official Teaser Trailer [HD]

A daughter’s journey. Distilling. The nectar of the stories and songs she heard as a child. Weaving. Ancient texts in the fabric of modern life. Rediscovering. The land of her childhood, absorbed from her mother. Where religion was synonymous with the celebration of life. In all its colours.

Journeying from the Himalayas to the Peninsular India. Through rivers, mountains, forests, caves. She meets many practitioners. Each conversation reveals unfathomable depths to seemingly simple rituals she inherited. The nature of life. Why we are born. Why we die. What is change. And what amidst this constant flux – joy, sorrow; success, failure; love, hate – is the one … constant, unchanging, unmoving.

This cinematic journey creates an experiential rendering of one of the Earth’s oldest spiritual traditions. Come. Wander. Experience.

*FEATURING* A former Australian miner. A Spanish sanyasi. An American journalist turned Yoga guru. A young Columbian Indophile. A Ho Chi Minh style Indian mystic who speaks 18 world languages. And many other soul wanderers.

*CREDITS* Direction, Camera, Script, Editing: Akanksha Joshi | Music: Chinmaya Dunster | Additional Music: Thomas Mahler | Singers: Sandeep Srivastav, Sukriti Sen | Executive Producer: Tulika Srivastava with Ridhima Mehra | Commissioning Editor: Rajiv Mehrotra

* Connect with Akanksha @ www.facebook.com/earthwitness

Punjabi Phulkari from Pakistan @ The South Asian Dastkar Bazaar .

Phulkarian embroidery technique from the Punjab region (divided between India and Pakistan) literally means flower working, which was at one time used as the word for embroidery, but in time the word “Phulkari” became restricted to embroidered shawls and head scarfs. Simple and sparsely embroidered odini (head scarfs), dupatta and shawls, made for everyday use, are called Phulkaris, whereas garments that cover the entire body, made for special and ceremonial occasions, are known as Baghs (“garden”).

The South Asian Dastkar Bazaar had Phulkari artisan women from Pakistan, earlier this year .

No religious subject or darbar scenes were embroidered. Phulkari encompassed life in the villages. Creative ability of Punjabi women has produced innumerable and intricate geometrical patterns. However, most motifs were taken from everyday life. Wheat and barley stalk with ears are a common motif.Traditionally, phulkari garments were part of a girl’s wedding trousseau, its motifs expressive of her emotions and the number of phulkari pieces defined the status of the family. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phulkari)

There is a good piece on the various kinds of Phulkaris by Frederic Rond who says “The word phulkari usually indicates the shawl that was loomed and embroidered to cover women’s heads or to be displayed in a gurudwara (Sikh temple). This tradition was often associated with the Sikh heritage but as it was also shared with Hindus and Muslims, it happens to be more geographically specific than religiously specific.
http://www.indianheritage.biz/files/PHULKARI-IH.pdf

The South Asian Dastkar Bazaar had artisans and craftspeople from Afghanistan, Bhutan, Bangladesh, Nepal, Pakistan and of course India.
The bazaar this year was from 23rd August to 1st September.

The Dastkar Nature Bazaar is located at Kisan Haat, Andheria Modh, near Chhatarpur Metro Station, on the Mehrauli-Gurgaon (M.G.Road) , New Delhi.

Open Daily 11a.m.-7p.m. Closed on Mondays .

The Nature Bazaar is an initiative of Government of Delhi and Delhi Tourism in association with Dastkar. (www.dastkar.org) It is spread over almost 7,000 sq. meters where people can get access to quality crafts and eco–friendly products. It will be a round the year cultural and retail hub, promoting innovative products.

Check for regular updates at the Dastkar Nature Bazaar at www.facebook.com/dastkarsociety

Dastkar – Hum to Gaye Bazaar

Grown ups, Shop. The Kids, Party!

Dastkar Nature Bazaar is a Crafts Dreamland. A space for mommies, daddies, and the bachha party. Safe to let the kids run around, experiencing the sights, the smells, the sounds, the taste of an India … handmade.

The Dastkar Nature Bazaar is located at Kisan Haat, Andheria Modh, near Chhatarpur Metro Station, on the Mehrauli-Gurgaon (M.G.Road) , New Delhi.

Living Blue at South Asian Dastkar Bazaar

Living Blue is a brand of Natural Indigo dyed tie-dyed shibori textiles from Bangladesh.

It is a brand of Nijera Cottage and Village Industries (NCVI) , an enterprise of the poorest, which started its journey in the field of business in 2007. NCVI is not a charity, it is a social business where workers are the owners. The dream is to have thousands of worker-owners in a few years and be the largest business organisation in North West Bangladesh. A partnership between Department for International Development (DfID) and Government of Bangladesh, SETU project of CARE Bangladesh is presently collaborating with NCVI to flourish as a social enterprise.

Details at http://www.communityledtotalsanitation.org/resource/living-blue-and-nijera-cottage-and-village-industries

The South Asian Dastkar Bazaar had artisans and craftspeople from Afghanistan, Bhutan, Bangladesh, Nepal, Pakistan and of course India. The dates of this bazaar were from 23rd August to 1st September, 2013.

The Dastkar Nature Bazaar is located at Kisan Haat, Andheria Modh, near Chhatarpur Metro Station, on the Mehrauli-Gurgaon (M.G.Road) , New Delhi.

The Nature Bazaar is an initiative of Government of Delhi and Delhi Tourism in association with Dastkar. (www.dastkar.org) It is spread over almost 7,000 sq. meters where people can get access to quality crafts and eco–friendly products. It will be a round the year cultural and retail hub, promoting innovative products.

Check for regular updates at the Dastkar Nature Bazaar at www.facebook.com/dastkarsociety

Top
LOADING CONTENT